Matthew 11

Reading for Monday, June 25: Matthew 11

In Matthew 11, John the Baptist asks an interesting question, one that belies his expectation of the Messiah: “Are you the one who was to come, or should we expect someone else?” It seems that Jesus’ ministry hadn’t quite met up to John’s expectation. I wonder how many of us would be in the same place if we were to come face to face with Jesus. He seems to have an uncanny way of defying our expectations.

Jesus sends word back to John. “Go back and report to John what you hear and see: The blind receive sight, the lame walk, those who have leprosy are cured, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the good news is preached to the poor.” In a clear allusion to Isaiah 61, Jesus tells John, in essence: “Make up your own mind. My identity is rooted in my actions.”

Jesus then launches into a series of woes against the cities and generation of his day. The miraculous deeds that have been performed in these cities have not produced faith. Jesus laments these circumstances, which prompts Him to pray: “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children,” (v25). Only those with eyes to see are privy to the glory of this message. Clarity of vision comes through faith. In all of this, Jesus bids the faithful to Him: “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

This entry was posted in Faith, Jesus, Project 3:45, Scripture and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Matthew 11

  1. Brad Stanton says:

    awesome verse–my yoke is easy, i love it

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